Lecturer

Dr. Monica Berger Gonzalez De White (Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute)

“Creating Common Ground in Transdisciplinary Research Collaborations”

Creating commom ground amongst diverse project partners requires a reflexive process to understand how many different socioepistemic cultures are present in the TD conversation, being aware of our own emic constructs that shape how we view the problem at hand and the preferences we have addressing them, as well as those of others. Achieving epistemic relativism to hold  dialogues at equal footing that foster mutual learning, can be facilitated by addressing intersectionality, understand ethnocentric biases, address power differentials early in the process, practice cultural humility, identify boundaries in the sub-systems and possible bridging objects and subjects. Overall, the correct TD vocabulary to fuel constructive collaborations comes from a highly reflexive but respectful nature of self and other.

“Boundary Science”

In Transdisciplinary processes barriers often emerge where different knowledge systems or socioepistemic cultures converge. Boundary management is an approach to bridge such barriers in an effort to enhance communication and collaboration, with clear lines of responsibility and accountability to opposite sides of the boundary. In this workshop we will explore how the use of ‘boundary objects’ and ‘bridging subjects’ can  be designed to directly enhance the mutual understanding of different viewpoints in a multiepistemic TD setting. We will explore the use of specific tools to enhance multidirectional reflexivity between project partners to aim at mutual learning and the co-production of knowledge.

 

 

Prof. Dr. Matthias Bergmann (Institute for Social-Ecological Research & Leuphana University Lüneburg)

“Group-Model-Building”

Group-Model-Building concurrently aims at cognitive and social integration. Hypotheses on the respective causes of the societal problem under investigation are named by all participants followed by a negotiation on their relations or contradictions finally ending up in a common model.

 

 

Dr. Bastian Drees (Lab Non-Textual Materials, Leibniz Information Centre for Science and Technology – TIB Hannover)

“Videos in science: Increasing visibility, comprehensibility and impact of your research”

The types of today’s science communication are becoming increasingly diverse and are by no means limited to text form. Videos can increase the visibility of the presented research and can also provide easier access for non-scientific researchers or interested laypersons. In addition, they enable complex and dynamic phenomena to be presented in a form that is difficult or impossible to transport through other media. Dr Drees will give an overview of the possibilities, status quo and best practice examples regarding videos in science.

 

 

Leonard Higi (IaF Urbane Zukunft (PaSyMo) University of Applied Sciences Potsdam)

“Participatory Social Simulation”

Participatory social simulation aims at fostering a common understanding of complex systems amongst stakeholders and integrating local knowledge into planning. Implemented in urban development processes it can combine the effects of group model building, quantitative agent-based modelling approaches and the visualization of process logics and consequences of action. The objective of the interaction with spatially explicit real-time models is to make emergent social phenomena visible, to generate stakeholders’ ownership and to provide orientational knowledge for future challenges and sustainable development.

 

 

Gerd Hofmann (Regional Council Darmstadt)

“NiddaMan: A critical Perspective from Practice”

As a NiddaMan project partner from the regional council, Gerd Hofmann will specifically reflect upon the experiences in the collaboration between scientists and societal stakeholders. He will critically draw conclusions on the project collaboration activities.

 

 

PD Dr. Diana Hummel (Institute for Social-Ecological Research)

“NiddaMan: Challenges in Collaboration between Science & Society”

Diana Hummel is a research scientist at ISOE and has been member of the executive board since April 2014. She is coordinator for the cross-divisional area “Academic Cooperation and Qualification of Young Scientists”. As organiser of the Summer School, Diana Hummel will moderate different reflective discussion formats.

“Quality Assurance for TD Project Success”

Because TD-projects address societal needs, there is a need to assure certain quality criteria on different levels. This applies to researchers, program managers and policymakers. The workshop will address these levels while highlighting the researchers’ responsibility.

 

 

Heide Kerber (Institute for Social-Ecological Research)

“Stakeholder Dialogue” and “Scenario planning”

The efficient integration of stakeholders is challenging, as they should not be seen as research objects, but rather equally important project members. The stakeholder dialogue is an option to incorporate the perspectives and the knowledge of stakeholders.

Scenario planning and development is a useful tool to integrate project results based on expert judgments. The results of different disciplinary backgrounds can be combined on a qualitative basis to derive esti-mates on future changes of key variables.

 

 

Dr. Jens Libbe (German Institute of Urban Affairs)

Difu Foto© David Ausserhofer

“The Challenge of Knowledge Integration: Cognitive, Communicative and Social”

The integration of knowledge is one of the key tasks to ensure a sustainable project outcome. How do disciplinary project partners integrate their knowledge rather than just working alongside? And how to engage relevant stakeholders in an efficient and equitable manner? Dr Libbe will elaborate on these challenges and identify key methodologies to overcome respective challenges.

“Stakeholder Dialogue”

The efficient integration of stakeholders is challenging, as they should not be seen as research objects, but rather equally important project members. The stakeholder dialogue is an option to incorporate the perspectives and the knowledge of stakeholders.

 

 

Robert Luetkemeier (Institute for Social-Ecological Research)

“Stakeholder Dialogue” and “Scenario planning”

The efficient integration of stakeholders is challenging, as they should not be seen as research objects, but rather equally important project members. The stakeholder dialogue is an option to incorporate the perspectives and the knowledge of stakeholders.

Scenario planning and development is a useful tool to integrate project results based on expert judgments. The results of different disciplinary backgrounds can be combined on a qualitative basis to derive esti-mates on future changes of key variables.

 

 

Dr. Alexandra Lux (Institute for Social-Ecological Research)

“Transdisciplinarity: New Mode of Research”

Alexandra Lux will provide an profound overview on transdisciplinarity, its origin, major evolutionary steps and urrent shape. She will highlight today’s challenges and carve out the necessity for inter- and transdisciplinary collaboration among and beyond scientists.

“Quality Assurance and Evaluation of Transdisciplinary Projects”

Evaluating research projects is a challenging task. This is particularly true for TD-projects that incorporate a larger set of scientific disciplines, challenging the evaluators as they need to cover larger knowledge domains. In order to address these challenges, Dr Lux will present different perspectives for quality assurance and evaluation with reference to several TD projects.

“Formative Evaluation”

Formative evaluation emphasizes discursive evaluation processes that initiate learning processes for researchers and evaluators. The aim of the workshop is to give participants an impression of how formative evaluation concepts can be established in transdisciplinary research.

 

 

Prof. Dr. Jörg Oehlmann (Goethe University Frankfurt)

“Transdisciplinary Research Project NiddaMan: Sustainable Water Resources Management in the Nidda Catchment Area”

Jörg Oehlmann will introduce the NiddaMan project as a local example of a transdisciplinary research project that developed and implemented a sustainable water resources management scheme along the river Nidda. Therein, citizens, administrative bodies as well as stakeholders from policy and science were engaged. Jörg Oehlmann will specifically reflect upon the scientific challenges in collaborating with non-scientific partners against the background of both interdisciplinary and essential disciplinary research work.

 

 

Dr. Regina Rhodius (RwL „Knowledge Dialogue Northern Black Forest”, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg)

“Rhetoric and Reality of Real-World Laboratories for Sustainability”

“Real-World Laboratories” (RwL) are increasingly becoming established as new research infrastructures designed to initiate social-ecological transformations. However, it remains to be seen whether they go beyond established approaches of transdisciplinary research. Based on the experiences of the first generation RwLs of Baden-Württemberg (Germany), this lecture will explore how RwLs generate and integrate transformative transdisciplinary knowledge and whether they can fulfil the associated expectations. The lecturer will critically and constructively discuss with junior sustainability scholars opportunities and pitfalls in conducting impactful real-world experiments in support of sustainability transformations/transitions.

 

 

Philipp Schrögel (Karlsruhe Institute for Technology)

“Innovative ways to communicate science”

Science communication can mean many different things – an evening lecture, an entertaining science festival or a dialogue on societal perspectives regarding a new technology. What are the trends? And what does this mean for young researchers? In the workshop, Philipp Schrögel will present an overview on the field together with selected insights from his science communication research projects. A special focus will be given to the questions of what audiences think of science presentations and who the typical audience is comprised of – or rather who is not reached by the traditional evening lecture. Furthermore, Philipp Schrögel will present different examples for innovative science communication projects and provide practical tips. In the second part of the workshop, a hands-on exercise gives participants the opportunity to explore their potential of innovative ideas to communicate science by working in small groups on creative solutions.